The magnanimous minister chastiseing [sic] Prussian perfidy

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“Fox, wearing a military cocked hat, with civilian dress, threatens Prussia (or Frederick William III) with his sabre, while he puts a foot on the sword that Prussia has dropped. The latter, a grotesque figure with a long pigtail and moustaches, kneels terrified at his feet, clasping his hands in supplication. Fox says, with an expression of sour and calculating contempt, ” – O you Prussian Marauder, you! – what I’ve caught you at last? – what, You took me for a double-faced-Talleyrand! did you? – did you think I was like yourself, to Look One way & Row another? – what you thought because I make Loyal Speeches now, that I must be a Turncoat? – O you Frenchified Villain! – I’ll teach you to humbug & insult my poor, dear, dear Master? – & to join with such Rascals as Boney, & O’Conner!” Prussia exclaims, terrified, “indeed! indeed! indeed! I could not help it. – ” Meanwhile, Napoleon, holding his sabre, and wearing feathered bicorne, with spurred jack-boots, furtively hastens up to Fox from behind, to read the open book which the latter displays to him behind his back: ‘State of the Nation’.

  • Printmaker: Gillray, James, 1756-1815, printmaker.
  • Title: The magnanimous minister chastiseing [sic] Prussian perfidy [graphic] / Jas. Gillray delt.
  • Created: [London : s.n, ca. 2 May 1806?]

Catalog Record & Digital Collection

806.05.02.01+

Acquired November 2013

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About lewiswalpolelibrary

The Lewis Walpole Library, a department of the Yale University Library since 1980, is an internationally recognized research collection in the field of British eighteenth-century studies. Its unrivalled collection of Walpoliana includes half the traceable volumes from Horace Walpole's famous library at Strawberry Hill and many letters and other manuscripts by him. The Library's book and manuscript collections, numbering over 32,000 volumes, cover all aspects of eighteenth-century British culture. The Library is also home to the largest and finest collection of eighteenth-century British graphic art outside the British Museum; its 35,000 satirical prints, portraits, and topographical views are an incomparable resource for visual material on many facets of English life of the period. Located in Farmington, Connecticut, forty miles north of New Haven and within easy distance of Boston and New York, the Lewis Walpole Library's collections also include drawings, paintings, and furniture, all housed on a 14-acre campus with four historically important structures and extensive grounds. The Library runs an active fellowship program and sponsors conferences, lectures, and exhibitions in cooperation with other Yale libraries and departments.

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