A new game of shuttle cock as played by his Majestys servants

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“Ministers and others strike at a shuttlecock above their heads inscribed ‘Speakers Warrant’; among the feathers sits a little man holding a crowned staff; he says: “Curse this game I dont Like it I never experienced Such boning about in my life, I wonder when you will have done”; he is Colman the Serjeant-at-Arms. Eldon, in his Chancellor’s wig and gown and holding the Purse of the Great Seal, is the centre of a close group; he says: “Dont knock it here we have not power to Strike it”. Perceval, in back view, wears his Chancellor of the Exchequer’s gown and holds a document inscribed ‘Majority’; he says: “Curse the thing I wish I had never Seen it away with it”. A second judge whose head is partly visible behind Eldon is probably Ellenborough. On the right is Gibbs, holding a paper inscribed ‘Attorn[ey Gen]eral’. He says: “D-n it Ill hit it as Hard as I can tho I’m almost afraid to meddle with it”. There are two others in the group, one is silent, the other resembles Canning (not in the Ministry); he says: “Sure honey Right or wrong I always stick to the Strongest Side so do let me have a Slap at it”. The sturdiest striker stands in back view on the left, with a paper inscribed ‘Read Bow Street’ projecting from his pocket; he says: “I cant Read it Die Veneris! why its Spanish to me we dont understand Them there warrants”. On the extreme left stands the Speaker, Abbot, with a bat inscribed ‘Double’; he says: “Dont Strike it to me again Ill have nothing more to do with it I’ve sent it to Bow Street”. The bats used are not the usual long-handled battledores as (e.g.) in British Museum Satires No. 9716, but short-handled wooden bats. Above the design: ‘NB The Feathers of the Shuttle Cock were pluked [sic] from a Sumersetshire Goose’ [Lethbridge, see British Museum satires no. 11538].”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Heath, William, 1795-1840, printmaker.
  • Title: A new game of shuttle cock as played by his Majestys servants for the mausement [sic] of John Bull [graphic].
  • Publication: [London] : Pub. 22 Apl. 1810 by Fores, Picadilli [sic], [22 April 1810]

Catalog Record 

810.04.22.01+

Acquired October 2018

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About lewiswalpolelibrary

The Lewis Walpole Library, a department of the Yale University Library since 1980, is an internationally recognized research collection in the field of British eighteenth-century studies. Its unrivalled collection of Walpoliana includes half the traceable volumes from Horace Walpole's famous library at Strawberry Hill and many letters and other manuscripts by him. The Library's book and manuscript collections, numbering over 32,000 volumes, cover all aspects of eighteenth-century British culture. The Library is also home to the largest and finest collection of eighteenth-century British graphic art outside the British Museum; its 35,000 satirical prints, portraits, and topographical views are an incomparable resource for visual material on many facets of English life of the period. Located in Farmington, Connecticut, forty miles north of New Haven and within easy distance of Boston and New York, the Lewis Walpole Library's collections also include drawings, paintings, and furniture, all housed on a 14-acre campus with four historically important structures and extensive grounds. The Library runs an active fellowship program and sponsors conferences, lectures, and exhibitions in cooperation with other Yale libraries and departments.

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