About lewiswalpolelibrary

The Lewis Walpole Library, a department of the Yale University Library since 1980, is an internationally recognized research collection in the field of British eighteenth-century studies. Its unrivalled collection of Walpoliana includes half the traceable volumes from Horace Walpole's famous library at Strawberry Hill and many letters and other manuscripts by him. The Library's book and manuscript collections, numbering over 32,000 volumes, cover all aspects of eighteenth-century British culture. The Library is also home to the largest and finest collection of eighteenth-century British graphic art outside the British Museum; its 35,000 satirical prints, portraits, and topographical views are an incomparable resource for visual material on many facets of English life of the period. Located in Farmington, Connecticut, forty miles north of New Haven and within easy distance of Boston and New York, the Lewis Walpole Library's collections also include drawings, paintings, and furniture, all housed on a 14-acre campus with four historically important structures and extensive grounds. The Library runs an active fellowship program and sponsors conferences, lectures, and exhibitions in cooperation with other Yale libraries and departments.

Epitre a M. de Walpole

Epitre a M. de Walpole title page

  • Title: Epitre a M. de Walpole : traduite de l’anglois.
  • Publication: [Paris?] : [publisher not identified], [approximately 1740]

Catalog Record 

763 740 Ep64

Acquired September 2018

Slugs in a saw-pit hell to pay

Slugs in a saw-pit hell to pay . Detailed description below

“Two timorous duellists face each other at close quarters in a saw-pit, trembling and dropping their weapons, namely pistol and blunderbuss; each has a heap of weapons at his feet: sabres, rapier, pistol, more blunderbusses. The hair of both rises on their heads. One (left) is in uniform, the other (right), who is smaller, wears fashionable civilian dress with tasselled Hessian boots. A scroll extends above their heads inscribed: ‘Did you mean to Offend me? indeed Sir not I.–indeed Sir I’m very glad on’t!!!’ A spectator (right) looks over the edge of the pit, holding a bowl from which he blows soap bubbles, which float over the head of the civilian. The bubble in the pipe is inscribed ‘Puff’, suggesting a publicity campaign.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Heath, William, 1795-1840, printmaker.
  • Title: Slugs in a saw-pit hell to pay, or, The direful courage of Dolla Lolla [graphic].
  • Publication: [London] : Pub. Jan. 1810 by S.W. Fores, Picadilli [sic], [January 1810]

Catalog Record

810.01.00.01+

Acquired October 2018

Modern aquatics

Modern aquatics . Detailed description below.

“A Thames wherry passes close to the wall of a riverside tavern, and is about to go under a high timber bridge. The two oarsmen have immense artificial-looking whiskers and curled hair, cf. British Museum satires no. 15962, no hats, and wear striped shirts, open at the neck, nautical in cut. They row a lady who sits erect in a grotesquely huge hat, with wide brim, high jam-pot crown, and towering ribbons. They row badly and carelessly. In waterside arbours spectators drink and smoke. On the extreme left steps lead to the water, and two more amateur oarsmen, looking like buccaneers, stand, while a boatman in waders holds the bow of a boat. Behind are urban houses.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Heath, William, 1795-1840, printmaker.
  • Title: Modern aquatics [graphic] / [man with an umbrella] Esq. del.
  • Publication: [London] : Pub. by T. McLean, 26 Haymarket, London, [ca. 1829]

Catalog Record 

829.00.00.113+

Acquired October 2018

The man wots got the whip hand of ’em all

The man wots got the whip hand of 'em all. Detailed description below

“A hand printing-press of metal (a Stanhope Press), supported on the stout legs of a man in breeches which seem to belong to a John Bull, puts to flight mere pigmy humans: two flee to the right, one propelled by a kick from a huge buckled shoe; two others have fallen. Two levers or handles serve as arms; one has a hand which grasps a giant pen, the feather entwined with three serpents which spit flame at the departing legs and cocked hat of Wellington, who, kicked into the air, disappears behind the upper right margin of the design. Another pair of legs, with the black stockings and buckled shoes of Eldon, project from the upper left margin; beside them a single leg and a broom indicate the departing Brougham. A second lever supports a print, ‘The Man Wot Drives The Sovereign’, copied from British Museum satires no. 15731; a flame issues from the press, threatening to scorch or destroy the print. The press is topped by a cap of Liberty inscribed ‘Free Press’ and encircled with a wreath. A little demon (a printer’s devil) rushes towards the press from the left, holding up a big ink-ball.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Heath, William, 1795-1840, printmaker.
  • Title: The man wots got the whip hand of ’em all [graphic].
  • Publication: [London] : Pub. May 30th, 1829, by T. McLean, 26 Haymarket …, [30 May 1829]

Catalog Record 

829.05.30.01+

Acquired October 2018

Jubilee Fair

Jubilee Fair. Detailed description below.

“View of the Jubilee Fair in Hyde Park; in foreground to left a small stage erected with a band playing and jesters performing, a small crowd stands in front, a few tents in central foreground with signs such as “Duke of Wellington Whitbreads Intire”, and on a lamp “Dancing and Singing Here”; beyond a crowd stands by river bank watching a sham sea fight, many sailing ships on water with smoke billowing from the scene, on the opposite river bank the fair continues.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Title: Jubilee Fair [graphic].
  • Publication: [London] : Published Sept. 10, 1814, by J. Pitts, No. 14 Great St. Andrew Street, Seven Dials, [10 September 1814]

Catalog Record

814.09.10.01++

Acquired September 2018

A Welch peasantry

title page. Additional description below

A series of ten prints showing the Welsh men, women and children in a variety of settings, mostly in rural landscapes with trees and wooden fences.

  • Author: Taylor, T. (Thomas), active 1804.
  • Title: A Welch peasantry / sketched from life by T. Taylor.
  • Published: [London] : Pubd. May 1, 1804, by Laurie & Whittle, 53, Fleet Street, London, [1 May 1804]

Catalog Record 

724 804T

Acquired September 2018

Eighteen of the most favourite new country dances

Paper fan

An engraved sheet folded and mounted on wooden sticks secured with brass and bone hardware to form a fan, probably designed as a portable aide-memoire, includes musical scores for eighteen dances as well as directions for the dance steps — e.g., “The 2nd Lady Lead round the 2d. Gent, the Gent. Do the Same, Lead Down the middle up again Cast off. Pousete” is given for the Duke of Clarence’s Fancy. The decorative border is hand-colored in pink. On the verso is a sheet decorated with a small emblem with musical instruments and notations.

  • Title: Eighteen of the most favourite new country dances [graphic].
  • Publication: [Edinburgh?] : [publisher not identified], [not before 1791]

Catalog Record 

792.00.00.106 Object Room

Acquired December 2018

A view in Regent’s Park, 1831

A View in Regents Park. Detailed description below

Steam-driven coaches and carriages and three-wheeled vehicles loaded with well-dressed passengers fill Regent’s Park. The chaos and conjestion fill the park with dust and dark smoke and result in accidents.

  • Printmaker: Alken, Henry Thomas, 1784-1851, printmaker.
  • Title: A view in Regent’s Park, 1831 [graphic].
  • Publication: London : Pubd. Feby. 20, 1828, by S & J. Fuller, at their Sporting Gallery, 34 Rathbone Place, [20 February 1828]

Catalog Record 

828.02.20.01+

Acquired October 2018

Modern St. George attacking the monster of despotism

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“Burdett, wearing armour, attacks a seven-headed monster, which guards the gate of the Treasury, a heavy door in a stone arch (left). On his shield is a St. George’s Cross inscribed ‘Bill of Rights’ and ‘Magna Charta’; at his feet is the word ‘Independance’ [cf. British Museum Satires No. 10732]. He says: “I will Stand up for the Rights of the People Or Perish in the Attempt”. The monster has a scaly body, webbed and barbed wings, a barbed tail, and fierce talons; its seven serpent-like necks, terminating in human heads, are encircled by a collar inscribed ‘Coruption’ [in reversed characters). All spit at Burdett, three emit words: Perceval says: “I Perceive what hes Doing”; Croker says: “I begin to Croke”; a third, Lethbridge (identified by his words), says: “Bless me He makes my Hair stand on End like the Quills upon the fretfull Porcupine”. His hair is standing up, and is flanked by two locks which suggest ass’s ears. A profile resembles Windham; one head may be presumed to represent Yorke. Under the feet of the monster are three torn papers: ‘Act of Habeas Corpus’, ‘Compact between the King and the People’, ‘Petition of Right’.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Heath, William, 1795-1840, printmaker.
  • Title: Modern St. George attacking the monster of despotism [graphic].
  • Publication: [London] : Pub. 6th of April by Fores, 50 Picadilli [sic], [6 April] 1810.

Catalog Record 

810.04.06.01+

Acquired October 2018

[Album of etchings by the Ingram sisters]

alt = Album of  etchings. Detailed description below.”

A volume of etchings by three daughters of art collector John Ingram 1767-1841) of Staindrop Hall in County Durham — Elizabeth Christian Ingram (1795-), Caroline Ingram (1800-1819), and Augusta Isabella Ingram (1802-) — who were living in Venice and took instruction from Venetian etcher Francesco Novellli whose own etchings were in manner of Rembrandt and whose influence can be seen in the sisters’ etchings. The style of the various impressions are very similar and were apparently made within a fairly short period if the dated prints are any indication, all bearing the date 1816 with some of the prints bound in first dated February 1816 and then March 1816. This dating seems to be confirmed by a contemporary inscription on the front free endpaper: “These are the works of the Miss Ingrams’ from their first lesson, 18…” Only five of the prints are unsigned; several impressions are in two or more states, using brown and black inks and various stocks of paper, a few bearing a British watermark and date of 1814. Some of the prints have been mounted, but most have been printed directly on contiguous leaves forming the signatures of the volume.

  • Title: [Album of etchings by the Ingram sisters] [graphic].
  • Created: [Italy], [1816]

Catalog Record 

Quarto 75 In54 816

Acquired December 2018