The political blind-buff man, or, The minist-l expediency

“Four men stand on the sea-shore, in back view but looking to the right: the King of Prussia stands between Holland (left) and Pitt (right); he holds Holland by the ear and kicks Pitt behind, saying, “This is the balance of Europe”. Pitt, who is blindfolded, says, “yes I’ll maintain it”; he holds out in each hand a naming fire-brand to two towns on the right, ‘Cronstadt’ and ‘Rerel’ [sic]. The whole district is in flames, and there are four other burning cities (one ‘Riga’); the flames and smoke from all six merge and are inscribed ‘Russia’, ‘Poland’, ‘Germany’, ‘Austria’. The sea which stretches between Pitt and the burning cities is the ‘Baltic’. On it is a boat containing four men: the helmsman says, “I would rather be a Baltic trader”; the two oarsmen say, “Do not mind it, it will bring other wars” and “No prize money”; a man looking through a telescope says, “No Galeons – Storms, Sholas & Rocks.” A man standing on the shore shouts to the boat “nothing good to be got by it.” Frederick William, who wears crown, military uniform, and jack-boots, conceals behind him, half thrust into his coat-pocket, a paper: ‘Danzic & Thorn’. Holland, a fat burgher, is smoking; he says “What a blessed Alliance”. In his right hand is a paper: ‘pyg–t O I hope all dis vill end in a Smoke.’ The fourth man, who stands on the extreme left, is a British citizen who scowls as he reads a newspaper inscribed ‘The Trade of the Baltic Lost – New Taxes Malt – Porter’. Across the sky stretches a large scroll inscribed ‘The Cause of the War’; from it is suspended a tiny medallion: ‘Ocsakow’.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • CreatorByron, Frederick George, 1764-1792, attributed name.
  • Title: The political blind-buff man, or, The minist-l expediency [graphic].
  • PublicationLondon : Pubd. April 1791 by W. Holland, No. 50 Oxford St., [April 1791]

Catalog Record

791.04.00.01+

Acquired May 2017

A perspective view of Dilston Hall

“View of hall with gardens and river in foreground, crossed by bridge at right with a courting couple; other figures in foreground including fishermen in centre foreground, a woman with child sitting at right and gardeners at left; poem in three columns lamenting the death of the Earl below.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • PrintmakerSpilsbury, Jonathan, approximately 1737-1812, printmaker.
  • TitleA perspective view of Dilston Hall, once the seat of the unfortunate James, Earl of Derwent-water [graphic] / T. Oliver delin. ; Spilsbury sculp., Russel Court, London.
  • Publication[London] : [publisher not identified], … published according to act of Parliament, July 17, 1766.

Catalog Record 

Topos N878 no. 2++

Acquired September 2017

The full moon in eclipse

An old man sits outdoors in an upholstered chair, looking through a telescope which is pointed up left to a black woman standing on a cliff with her dress pulled up and her large derrière bared. A dog sits by the man’s chair with a similar look on its face as it too looks up at the woman.

  • Printmaker: Newton, Richard, 1777-1798, printmaker.
  • Title: The full moon in eclipse [graphic] / desin’d & etch’d by Rd. Newton.
  • PublicationLondon : Publish’d by W. Holland, Oxford St., May 8, 1797.

Catalog Record

797.05.08.02+

Acquired May 2017

The last of the Boroughbridges

“Wetherell (left), an invalid in dressing-gown and night-cap, reclines in an arm-chair, exhausted but laughing. Facing him stands Eldon in deep dejection, saying, with both hands raised, ‘Poor Boroughbridge! how is it with you?’ Cumberland, on the extreme right, stands behind Eldon, covering his face with his handkerchief; he says: ‘Facetious to the last!–It is quite affecting!’ Horace Twiss leans on the back of Wetherell’s chair; Chandos, dressed as a woman, stoops over the patient; both are smiling. Wetherell: ‘All over my friends! just in time to hear my “last speech and dying words”! But dont look so grave about it, I assure you we treat the matter in our house as if it was an excellent joke–to be sent out of the world with a dose of Russell’s purge”! is so droll; & then, we are to have such a merry funeral’. On a commode is a bottle labelled ‘Russell’s purge’. Peel, smiling, and Goulburn, holding a handkerchief to his face and leaning on Peel, watch from the background.”–British Museum online catalogue, description of the original version of the print.

  • TitleThe last of the Boroughbridges [graphic] / HB [monogram].
  • Publication[London] : Pub. by S. Gans, Southampton Street, Strand, March 14th, 1831.

Catalog Record 

831.03.14.01+

Acquired March 2018

The man wot drives the sovereign

Wellington stands full-length in profile to the left, dressed as the driver of a mail-coach, holding his whip in his left hand. His (gloved) right hand touches the broad brim of his hat. He wears a triple-caped greatcoat, tight at the waist, over tightly strapped white trousers, and is smart and erect. The speech-balloon above his head reads, “While I hold the Reins (your Honnor) I’ll drive against all Opposition!!!”

  • TitleThe man wot drives the sovereign [graphic].
  • Publication[London] : Pubd. by J.L. Marks, Artillery St., Bishopsgate, London, [ca. April 1829?]

Catalog Record 

829.04.00.13

Acquired June 2017

The children of India worshiping the golden calf

“Indian men and women kneel before a large rectangular pedestal on which stands a golden calf with the head of Hastings. Three Indians lie on the pedestal at Hastings’s feet, making gestures of despair and entreaty. From his mouth protrudes a sword (left) inscribed ‘The Brand of Devastation’. On his back sits Wilkes facing the tail (right) which he lifts with one hand; in the other is the cap of ‘Liberty’ in which he catches large jewels excreted by the Golden Calf. He wears a livery gown and says: “Who would not wipe a Calf’s Backside, To gain the Sparks of Eastern Pride”. At the Calf’s feet lie a crown, sceptre, and orb, with (?) scimitars. On the ground and on the extreme left a well-dressed man stands before an altar holding a knife which drips blood over the altar; he says, pointing to an Indian who lies at his feet, stabbed through the heart: ‘When British Judges rule the Coast, The Natives must obey, No palliative means we boast, By G——you die or pay’. In the foreground (right) stand Thurlow and a military officer. The Chancellor, who wears his wig and robe, is blindfolded; in his right hand he holds erect the ‘Sword of Justice’, which is being taken from him by the officer who holds a diamond against the blade. In Thurlow’s left hand is a bag inscribed ‘Gold Moors’; he says: “Which Powerful God my wavering mind controuls, And my Sage Brows with Golden bands infolds, ‘Tis Mammons self I can be Just no more, Take thou the Sword give me the Golden Store”. The officer, who wears a wallet or haversack inscribed ‘Diamonds’, says: “So shall we Triumph while the Diamond’s smile, Can melt the Soul and Justice’s beguile.” Three Indians who kneel in the foreground below the pedestal of the Golden Calf are offering money (a bag inscribed ‘Gold Moors’) and jewel-boxes to Hastings.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • TitleThe children of India worshiping the golden calf [graphic] : this be thy God O India! who has brought thee to the verge of destruction.
  • Publication:[ London] : Publish’d May 15, 1788, by J. Berry, No. 129 Oxford Road, [15 May 1788]

Catalog Record 

Drawer 788.05.15.01

Acquired October 2017

His Excellency Hamet Ben Hamet Ben Haddu Otter

Half-length portrait in oval of Hamet ben Hamet, half-length in Arabic burnous, directed to right, looking towards the viewer.

  • Printmaker: Luttrell, Edward, printmaker.
  • TitleHis Excellency Hamet Ben Hamet Ben Haddu Otter [graphic] : Ambassador Extraordinary from [the] Emperor of Fez & Morocco to His Matie. of Great Britain, anno 1682 / E. Luttrell fe. ; I. Lloyd ex.
  • Publication[London] : [John Lloyd], [between 1682 and 1713]

Catalog Record 

682.00.00.01

Acquired November 2017