A catalogue of the classic contents of Strawberry Hill collected by Horace Walpole

  • AuthorWalpole, Horace, 1717-1797.
  • TitleA catalogue of the classic contents of Strawberry Hill collected by Horace Walpole.
  • Published[London] Smith and Robins [1842]

Catalog Record 

485 842 C76 II Copy 3

Acquired July 2017

The procession of the Lord Mayor of London

“Stylised representation of the Lord Mayor’s procession, framing a blank space in the centre of the sheet; two rows of figures at the top, 7 groups one above the other to either side, and the City Counsel on foot, the Aldermen and Lord Mayor on horseback forming the bottom of the frame.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • PrintmakerCole, James, 1715-1774, printmaker.
  • TitleThe procession of the Lord Mayor of London, 29th of October [graphic].
  • Publication[London] : Published according to act of Parliament Novemr. the 4th, 1742, and sold by James Cole engraver in Great Kirby Street, Hatton Garden, [4 November 1742]

Catalog Record 

File 66 742 C689++

Acquired November 2017

To all to whom these presents shall come….

A certificate recording the appointment 31 May 1781 of “Henry Hastings gentleman to be collector for … the district of Colchester and Maldon … for administering the oaths … taken by paper-makers … for proving that paper brought to be stamped as stock in hand, was really, and bona fide made in Great Britain, before the commencement of … An act for repealing the present duties upon paper, pasteboards, millboards and scaleboards, made in Great Britain, and for granting other duties in lieu thereof … and also the oath taken by such makers of paper, for ascertaining the value of such paper …”. The cost of war with America caused the British government to increase taxes. In 1781 the existing excise duty on paper was abolished and replaced with a more complicated scheme which imposed seventy-eight different rates applied on the various types of paper. Transitional arrangements allowed that paper produced before the new system came into force could be taxed at the old rate, the holder of this certificate being required to take oaths from papermakers concerning such previously-manusfactured paper stock.

  • TitleTo all to whom these presents shall come, greeting. Know ye, that we whose names are hereunto set, and seals affixed, being the major part of the Chief Commissioners and Governors for the management of the receipt of excise, and other duties put under our management and receipt, in pursuance of the powers and authorities to us given, have constitued, deputed and appointed …
  • Publication[London] : [publisher not identified], [1781]

Catalog Record 

File 66 780 T627+

Acquired July 2017

The docter [sic] himself pouring out his whole soul for 1 s.

“Dr. James Graham, the famous quack, stands on a small platform or pedestal, addressing an audience of both sexes who sit and stand in front of him. He stands rather to the right of the design looking left, his right hand raised, his left holding a rolled paper as in British Museum Satire no. 6324. He wears a bag-wig and ruffled shirt. Those of the audience whose faces are visible are probably portraits, but only Fox, Wilkes, and (?) Perdita Robinson can be identified. Three persons sit on a raised seat immediately under the lecturer and with their backs towards him: a young man puts his arm round a lady who draws back with a coy expression; the third is Fox who sits gloomily impassive, his head supported on his hand, perhaps annoyed at the way in which Mrs. Robinson looks towards the man standing next her, who stands on the extreme right in profile to the left. He is slim and wears the fashionable riding-dress but is very ugly. Two rows of people sit on forms facing the lecturer. Others stand on the left. Wilkes is in profile to the right, an elderly beau with receding hair, sunken eyes, and broken teeth.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • PrintmakerBoyne, John, approximately 1750-1810, printmaker.
  • TitleThe docter [sic] himself pouring out his whole soul for 1 s. [graphic] / I.B.
  • PublicationLondon : Published as the act directs Feby. 12, 1783, by R. Rusted, No. 3 Bridge St., Ludgate Hill, [12 February 1783]

Catalog Record

783.02.12.01+

Acquired May 2017

The golden image that Nebuchadnezzar the king had set up

“A sequel to British Museum Satires no. 6438. George III, seated on a balloon, points downwards with his sceptre to an image of Pitt (right) as a naked child, on a column which is inscribed ‘Family Presumption’. The king looks down at North, Fox, and Burke, saying, “I command you O Shadrach Mesech & Abednego!” The three stand (left) in attitudes expressing intense self-righteousness; they say: “Know O King we will not worship ye Golden Image”; on each head rests a tongue of flame. They stand outside a dilapidated building on the extreme left inscribed ‘St Stephens’, shored up by a beam, whose base is at their feet, inscribed ‘Resolutions Unrescinded’. From its coping-stone flies an ensign flag inscribed ‘Firm S.P.Q.B.’ The king’s balloon is inscribed ‘Prerogative’; its lower axis emits a blast inscribed ‘Gracious Answer’. Behind the balloon and Pitt are clouds inscribed ‘Breath of Popularity’. Pitt stands sucking his finger (cf. British Museum Satires no. 6417); on his head is a sugar-loaf surmounted by a flag inscribed ‘Feby 28′, an emblem of the Grocers’ Company which had entertained him on that day, see British Museum Satires no. 6442. Kneeling figures do obeisance before the image of Pitt, those in the foreground representing the least reputable trades: a lamplighter (left), with his ladder and oil-can, kneels in profile to the right; a butcher prostrates himself; a chimney-sweep kneels with clasped hands; a ragged scavenger, his shovel and basket beside him, kneels in profile to the left, the basket stands on a paper inscribed ‘[Worshipfu]ll Company of Scavenger[s]’. In the foreground lie papers inscribed ‘Garret Address’ (an allusion to the mock elections of Garratt), ‘Address’, and ‘The worshipfull Company of Chimney Sweepers’. A crowd of kneeling figures (left) is worshipping the idol; they hold standards, three of which are inscribed ‘Bristol’, ‘Westminster’, and ‘London’, representing the addresses to the king which had been compared by Fox to those made to Charles II, see British Museum Satires no. 6438, &c.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • PrintmakerCollings, Samuel, printmaker.
  • TitleThe golden image that Nebuchadnezzar the king had set up [graphic] / Annibal Scratch del. et sculp.
  • Publication[London] : Pub. by W. Wells, No. 132 Fleet Street, March 11th, 1784.

Catalog Record

784.03.11.05+

Acquired May 2017

Bat, Cat & Mat, or, How happy could I be with either

Caricature with Queen Caroline on the arms of Bergami (left) and Alderman Wood (right), jubilant on the sidewalk before the door of “Mother Wood”. The Queen wears a watch at her waist and two miniature portraits hanging from cords from her bosom.

  • PrintmakerLane, Theodore, 1800-1828, printmaker.
  • TitleBat, Cat & Mat, or, How happy could I be with either [graphic].
  • PublicationLondon : Pub. by G. Humphrey, 27 St. James’s St., Jan. 19, 1821.

Catalog Record

821.01.19.02

Acquired March 2017

The historians

A lady (Mrs. Catherine Macaulay) with an aquiline profile sits at a table opposite a clergy man (Dr. Wilson) as she writes with a quill pen. The walls are lined with full bookshelves separated in the middle by a fireplace with a mantelpiece on which sits a bust of “Alfred rex”. Both figures wear the same enormous hair as in British Museum no. 5441.

  • PrintmakerDarly, Mattina, printmaker.
  • TitleThe historians [graphic] / Mattina Darly sculp.
  • Publication[London] : Pub. May 1, 1777, by MDarly, 39 Strand, [1 May 1777]

Catalog Record 

777.05.01.08

Acquired April 2018