The grounds

Satire on Robert Walpole, showing the grounds for the Motion to remove him from office.

  • TitleThe grounds [graphic].
  • Publication[London] : [publisher not identified], publish’d according to act of Parliament, March 7, 1741.

Catalog Record

741.03.07.02.3+

Acquired March 2017

Ready mony the prevailing candidate

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 Print shows on the left, a statue of Justice in a niche beneath which a candidate, doffing his hat, offers a purse of money to a voter who replies, “Twill scarce pay, make it twenty more”, beside them a gentleman points to the statue saying “Regard Justice” to another carrying a bundle on his shoulder who replies, “We fell out, I lost money by her”. In the centre, in front of a large crowd are two candidates, both waving their hats, slip coins into two of the many pockets of a voter’s coat; one candidate says, “Sell not your Country” and the voter replies, “No Bribery but Pocketts are free”. Further to the right another candidate, saying “Accept this small acknowledgment”, offers a purse to a gentleman who grovels on the ground for coins that have been thrown down by the prevailing candidate, from his position on a chair supported by poles on the shoulders of four men. On the right, a statue of Folly in a niche empties bags of coins; before the statue is an altar on which a fire burns, a candidate kneels at its base imploring, “Help me Folly or my Cause is lost”; to the left of the altar, is a butcher crying “See here, see here” and to the right, a classical philosopher, saying “Let not thy right hand know what thy left does”, puts his hand behind him to received a bribe from a young man. Beyond is a tavern outside the landlord, wearing horns, calls out “He kist my Wife he has my Vote”; outside the tavern hangs the sign of a bottle with a large globe attached.

  • Title: Ready mony the prevailing candidate, or The humours of an election [graphic].
  • Published: London : Sold at the Print Shop in Grays Inn, [1727]

Catalog Record  & Digital Collection

727.00.00.02

Acquired July 2013

The first day of term, or, The devil among the lawyers

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“An altered copy of British Museum number 3764 (circa 1792), a mezzotint after Dighton. The dress of the two non-barristers has been modernized, one or two background heads have been omitted. The principal barrister has been altered from a grotesque to a portrait of MacNally, adapted, in reverse, from No. 11409. It is he who holds out his hand for coins to a melancholy countryman, and has a large brief inscribed ‘Gaffer Flatscull agt Ralph Clodpole’. This and all other inscriptions are as in No. 3764. The attorney (right), who stands in profile to the left holding a pamphlet: ‘Practic'[sic] of petty Fogging’, wears a top-hat and has short cropped hair, and is better characterized than in the original and may be a portrait.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Title: The first day of term, or, The devil among the lawyers [graphic].
  • Published: [Dublin : Pub’d by T. O’Callaghan, 11 Bride St., one door from Ross Lane, 1809?]

Catalog Record & Digital Collection

809.00.00.63

Acquired November 2013