The political blind-buff man, or, The minist-l expediency

“Four men stand on the sea-shore, in back view but looking to the right: the King of Prussia stands between Holland (left) and Pitt (right); he holds Holland by the ear and kicks Pitt behind, saying, “This is the balance of Europe”. Pitt, who is blindfolded, says, “yes I’ll maintain it”; he holds out in each hand a naming fire-brand to two towns on the right, ‘Cronstadt’ and ‘Rerel’ [sic]. The whole district is in flames, and there are four other burning cities (one ‘Riga’); the flames and smoke from all six merge and are inscribed ‘Russia’, ‘Poland’, ‘Germany’, ‘Austria’. The sea which stretches between Pitt and the burning cities is the ‘Baltic’. On it is a boat containing four men: the helmsman says, “I would rather be a Baltic trader”; the two oarsmen say, “Do not mind it, it will bring other wars” and “No prize money”; a man looking through a telescope says, “No Galeons – Storms, Sholas & Rocks.” A man standing on the shore shouts to the boat “nothing good to be got by it.” Frederick William, who wears crown, military uniform, and jack-boots, conceals behind him, half thrust into his coat-pocket, a paper: ‘Danzic & Thorn’. Holland, a fat burgher, is smoking; he says “What a blessed Alliance”. In his right hand is a paper: ‘pyg–t O I hope all dis vill end in a Smoke.’ The fourth man, who stands on the extreme left, is a British citizen who scowls as he reads a newspaper inscribed ‘The Trade of the Baltic Lost – New Taxes Malt – Porter’. Across the sky stretches a large scroll inscribed ‘The Cause of the War’; from it is suspended a tiny medallion: ‘Ocsakow’.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • CreatorByron, Frederick George, 1764-1792, attributed name.
  • Title: The political blind-buff man, or, The minist-l expediency [graphic].
  • PublicationLondon : Pubd. April 1791 by W. Holland, No. 50 Oxford St., [April 1791]

Catalog Record

791.04.00.01+

Acquired May 2017

The full moon in eclipse

An old man sits outdoors in an upholstered chair, looking through a telescope which is pointed up left to a black woman standing on a cliff with her dress pulled up and her large derrière bared. A dog sits by the man’s chair with a similar look on its face as it too looks up at the woman.

  • Printmaker: Newton, Richard, 1777-1798, printmaker.
  • Title: The full moon in eclipse [graphic] / desin’d & etch’d by Rd. Newton.
  • PublicationLondon : Publish’d by W. Holland, Oxford St., May 8, 1797.

Catalog Record

797.05.08.02+

Acquired May 2017

The man wot drives the sovereign

Wellington stands full-length in profile to the left, dressed as the driver of a mail-coach, holding his whip in his left hand. His (gloved) right hand touches the broad brim of his hat. He wears a triple-caped greatcoat, tight at the waist, over tightly strapped white trousers, and is smart and erect. The speech-balloon above his head reads, “While I hold the Reins (your Honnor) I’ll drive against all Opposition!!!”

  • TitleThe man wot drives the sovereign [graphic].
  • Publication[London] : Pubd. by J.L. Marks, Artillery St., Bishopsgate, London, [ca. April 1829?]

Catalog Record 

829.04.00.13

Acquired June 2017

The docter [sic] himself pouring out his whole soul for 1 s.

“Dr. James Graham, the famous quack, stands on a small platform or pedestal, addressing an audience of both sexes who sit and stand in front of him. He stands rather to the right of the design looking left, his right hand raised, his left holding a rolled paper as in British Museum Satire no. 6324. He wears a bag-wig and ruffled shirt. Those of the audience whose faces are visible are probably portraits, but only Fox, Wilkes, and (?) Perdita Robinson can be identified. Three persons sit on a raised seat immediately under the lecturer and with their backs towards him: a young man puts his arm round a lady who draws back with a coy expression; the third is Fox who sits gloomily impassive, his head supported on his hand, perhaps annoyed at the way in which Mrs. Robinson looks towards the man standing next her, who stands on the extreme right in profile to the left. He is slim and wears the fashionable riding-dress but is very ugly. Two rows of people sit on forms facing the lecturer. Others stand on the left. Wilkes is in profile to the right, an elderly beau with receding hair, sunken eyes, and broken teeth.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • PrintmakerBoyne, John, approximately 1750-1810, printmaker.
  • TitleThe docter [sic] himself pouring out his whole soul for 1 s. [graphic] / I.B.
  • PublicationLondon : Published as the act directs Feby. 12, 1783, by R. Rusted, No. 3 Bridge St., Ludgate Hill, [12 February 1783]

Catalog Record

783.02.12.01+

Acquired May 2017

English coronet auction by K-, P- & Co.

In a large room French aristocrats crowd across a table from Pitt who is taking money while handing a pen to the man opposite who holds a crown in his left arm as he throws coins toward Pitt’s grasping hand. Above Pitt stands George III behind podium, gavel in one hand and another crown extended toward one of the many bidders shouting comments and prices. The King calls out, “This is a lot, gentlemen, of superior brilliancy to the last. This, this raises you above your fellows in a very high degree indeed. I pity your distresses from my soul, what, what, what was that you were saying about jewels, Madames, too high. You may ride over the necks of half the nation with this upon your coach. You may get in debt as fast as you please and never pay. Mind that gentlemen, never pay.” The Queen walks up a ladder behind the King to retrieve more crowns from the shelves behind the King’s podium, turning her head to say, “Pay some attention to that Lady’s jewels, my love.”

  • CreatorByron, Frederick George, 1764-1792, attributed name.
  • TitleEnglish coronet auction by K-, P- & Co., or, Comfort for the late French noblesse [graphic] / designed by Corruption ; executed by Avarice.
  • PublicationLondon : Pubd. by Willm. Holland, No. 50 Oxford Street, July 8, 1790.

Catalog Record 

790.07.08.01+

Acquired May 2017

 

A visit to Bedlam

Three mad persons look out the small windows of their cells. The man on the left wears a makeshift crown and grins out at the horrified couple who looks in. Above his cell is written “You lie, you mad dog, I am as hones a woman as any Parson’s wife in London!” And futher below, “You are a cuckold.” The two men on the right look at the two scowling women in their cells in horror.

  • PrintmakerNewton, Richard, 1777-1798, printmaker, artist.
  • TitleA visit to Bedlam [graphic] / designd. and etchd. by R. Newton.
  • PublicationLondon : Pubd. August 7, 1794, by Willm. Holland, No. 50 Oxford St., [7 August 1794]

Catalog record 

794.08.07.01+

Acquired May 2017

The golden image that Nebuchadnezzar the king had set up

“A sequel to British Museum Satires no. 6438. George III, seated on a balloon, points downwards with his sceptre to an image of Pitt (right) as a naked child, on a column which is inscribed ‘Family Presumption’. The king looks down at North, Fox, and Burke, saying, “I command you O Shadrach Mesech & Abednego!” The three stand (left) in attitudes expressing intense self-righteousness; they say: “Know O King we will not worship ye Golden Image”; on each head rests a tongue of flame. They stand outside a dilapidated building on the extreme left inscribed ‘St Stephens’, shored up by a beam, whose base is at their feet, inscribed ‘Resolutions Unrescinded’. From its coping-stone flies an ensign flag inscribed ‘Firm S.P.Q.B.’ The king’s balloon is inscribed ‘Prerogative’; its lower axis emits a blast inscribed ‘Gracious Answer’. Behind the balloon and Pitt are clouds inscribed ‘Breath of Popularity’. Pitt stands sucking his finger (cf. British Museum Satires no. 6417); on his head is a sugar-loaf surmounted by a flag inscribed ‘Feby 28′, an emblem of the Grocers’ Company which had entertained him on that day, see British Museum Satires no. 6442. Kneeling figures do obeisance before the image of Pitt, those in the foreground representing the least reputable trades: a lamplighter (left), with his ladder and oil-can, kneels in profile to the right; a butcher prostrates himself; a chimney-sweep kneels with clasped hands; a ragged scavenger, his shovel and basket beside him, kneels in profile to the left, the basket stands on a paper inscribed ‘[Worshipfu]ll Company of Scavenger[s]’. In the foreground lie papers inscribed ‘Garret Address’ (an allusion to the mock elections of Garratt), ‘Address’, and ‘The worshipfull Company of Chimney Sweepers’. A crowd of kneeling figures (left) is worshipping the idol; they hold standards, three of which are inscribed ‘Bristol’, ‘Westminster’, and ‘London’, representing the addresses to the king which had been compared by Fox to those made to Charles II, see British Museum Satires no. 6438, &c.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • PrintmakerCollings, Samuel, printmaker.
  • TitleThe golden image that Nebuchadnezzar the king had set up [graphic] / Annibal Scratch del. et sculp.
  • Publication[London] : Pub. by W. Wells, No. 132 Fleet Street, March 11th, 1784.

Catalog Record

784.03.11.05+

Acquired May 2017