The English ambassador and his suite before the King at Madrid, 1790

“The King of Spain sits on a circular dais under a canopy, turning his head away from the English ambassador (left), a stout John Bull wearing top-boots behind whom stand four pugilists. Three Spaniards with pikes stand on the extreme right behind the throne, and three courtiers stand in the background. The King wears a short tunic and ruff with a feathered hat; all the Spaniards have long upturned moustaches, all look dismayed. Three of the pugilists are inscribed: ‘Big Ben’ [Benjamin Brain], ‘Humphries’, and ‘Mendoza’; the fourth is Ward. Beneath the design is etched: ‘Great Sir, I am arrived from Albion’s Court, Who have taken in Dudgeon what you may think Sport; So it may for the present; but we’ll soon make it appear, You’ll have reason to laugh the wrong side of your ear! Our Traders in Nootka, by some of your Curs, Were all sent to Quod and robb’d of their Furs, Your right so to do which you claim from the Pope, We Britons dont value the end of a rope! It’s a farce you may make your weak Subjects believe, But our right’s equal to yours from Adam and Eve. Therefore if you don’t make us immediate amends, No longer can we look upon you as Friends, Should you wish for a War we have got a new race, Of such brave fighting fellows, not the Devil dare face! A sample I’ve brought, only four of our men, Mendoza, Dick Humphries, Joe Ward, and Big Ben: So great is their power each Lad with one blow, Would knock down an Ox, or twelve Spaniards lay low, At home we can raise twelve hundred like these, That would crush all your Troops as easy as fleas. For Centuries past England’s rul’d o’er the main, And if it please Heavn’n hope to do so again. Thus with Sailors and Bruisers we your power defy, Being determin’d to conquer or fight till we die!'”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • CreatorByron, Frederick George, 1764-1792, attributed name.
  • TitleThe English ambassador and his suite before the King at Madrid, 1790 [graphic] / J.N. 1790.
  • PublicationLondon : Pubd. by Wm. Holland, No. 50 Oxford St., May 12, 1790.

Catalog Record 

790.05.12.01+

Acquired May 2017

The whole truth, or, John Bull with his eyes opened

Caricature with Queen Caroline (left) as Lady Macbeth in the mad scene, standing in the street before two shops; she holds a candlestick raised in her right hand as she holds out her dress with her left hand, looking down horror at her skirt which is decorated with three panels with images of men and labeled “Man B”, “Austi”, “Sapio”, “Mat …”, and “Bat”. The initials “C.B” are embroidered on the trim of her knickers. Standing to her right is an astonished John Bull who holds his hat in front of his face, arm extended in horror. The shop on the left is identified by a sign below second story windows with broken glass: Wholesale Dealer in Brass Forges, Ranges, &c N.B. Odd jobs in general. The street level is shuttered, its doors covered in graffiti: Gone away, Gone abroad, Empty, M.T. The one door has a knocker in the shape of a ram’s head. John Bull stands before the second door which stands open as if he has just emerged. The windows are curtained and the building well maintained. The large sign above reads “Time & Common-Sense Occulists. N.B. Films expeditiously removed &c. Below this sign (left) is a pair of large spectacles with the two eyeballs turned towards the shop on the left and a smaller sign (right) that reads “No connexion with the next shop.”

  • PrintmakerLane, Theodore, 1800-1828, printmaker.
  • TitleThe whole truth, or, John Bull with his eyes opened [graphic].
  • Publication[London] : Pubd. by G. Humphrey, 27 St. James’s St., Feb. 1st, 1821.

Catalog Record

821.02.01.04

Acquired March 2017

The rat hunt

lwlpr35076-663x1024

“The head and shoulders of the dog, who has a handsome collar inscribed ‘John Bull’, project into the design from the right. One paw presses down a rat with the head of Wellington, who looks up in anguish at the dog’s angry jowl. Behind are other frightened rats with human heads: a bloated bishop, Peel, Wetherell, Eldon, Cumberland, and two others. The rats have been robbing the barn of ears of wheat.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • PrintmakerGrant, C. J. (Charles Jameson), active 1830-1852, printmaker.
  • TitleThe rat hunt [graphic].
  • Publication[London : W. Chubb, 1832]

Catalog Record & Digital Collection

Folio 75 G750 823 no. 7

Acquired November 2016

Arming John Bull to fight the buggoboos!!!

lwlpr34591 (1024x737)

“John Bull, a much overburdened soldier, looks up in angry dismay at a helmet inscribed ‘Glory’ which Pitt (left) is about to place on his head. He says, “O D—-n the Glory I shall never be able to bear it all!” Pitt stands in profile to the right; the large plumed helmet which he holds up in both hands is irradiated. From his pocket hangs a long paper headed ‘List of Ships £5000000’. John Bull, short and stout, stands full face wearing a gorget, with two pistols in his belt, a long sabre suspended horizontally from his waist, its blade inscribed ‘Twenty more Kill em!’ He holds a blunderbuss in his right hand, which fires ‘Pop Pop’ into the air; a large pike in his left hand, a broadsword held in his left arm; a musket and a huge knapsack are slung on his back. In the foreground are ordnance stores: a barrel (left) inscribed ‘Right Rich – mond double Proof’ with cannon-balls, and (right) a cannon, cannon-balls, drum, and flag. In the background a fleet of ships sails from the shore on which stands a cheering crowd.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • PrintmakerCollings, Samuel, attributed name.
  • TitleArming John Bull to fight the buggoboos!!! [graphic].
  • Publication[London] : Pub. by S.W. Fores, No. 3 Piccadilly, Aug. 6, 1790.

Catalog Record & Digital Collection

790.08.06.01+

Acquired May 2016

Poor Mr. Bull in a pretty situation

lwlpr34234 (725x1024)

“John Bull, a fat “cit”, is beset by descending water covered with the word ‘Tax’, many times repeated, in which dogs, cats, and pitchforks fall with violence. His eyes and spectacles are transfixed by a pitchfork inscribed ‘Window Tax’; the shaft of another inscribed ‘Malt & Hops Tax’ sticks in his bleeding mouth, dislodging teeth. His paunch is pierced with a third fork; the handle, inscribed ‘Tax …’ [&c. &c], supports an angry cat, spitting ‘Tax …’ Another falling cat knocks off his wig, which emits a cloud of powder inscribed ‘Powder Tax’. His gouty feet, in slashed shoes, are stabbed by three pitchforks: ‘Corn Laws’ [the biggest, cf. British Museum Satires No. 15510]; ‘Leather Tax’; ‘Land Tax’. A ‘Dog Tax’ strikes down J. B.’s dog, its collar inscribed ‘Poor Tray’. Another dog worries a cat (left). J. B. holds up a derelict umbrella, inscribed ‘Trade’, pierced by many prongs and useless.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • PrintmakerHeath, William, 1795-1840, printmaker.
  • TitlePoor Mr. Bull in a pretty situation [graphic] : for the rain it raineth every day / W. Heath.
  • Publication[London : Pub. March 20, 1830, by T. McLean, 26 Haymarket, London, 20 March 1830]

Catalog Record & Digital Collection

830.03.20.02+

Acquired May 2016

An hieroglyphic, describing the state of Great Britain and the continent of Europe

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“Three symmetrically prancing lions (left) and Napoleon (right) as ‘The Beast’ face each other across a narrow channel. In the background (left) John Bull, an obese citizen, sits surrounded by casks and bales (one marked ‘I’ or ‘L M’) under the Tree of the ‘Constitution’. This has three branches: in the uppermost is a royal crown, the others (presumably) represent the Lords and Commons, … Behind him are symbols of industry: men reaping, a bee-hive, a thatched farm-house. Above the tree flies an angel with a flaming sword … Napoleon’s head is scarcely caricatured, but has two horns – on one is poised an imperial crown, on the other the Papal tiara. In his dragon’s claws he holds up a dagger and three short chains (for the lions); he is branded ‘666’, and his tail is triply barbed. He has webbed wings, scaly shoulders, and a tiger-like body. Under his feet are broken fragments of crowns, sceptres, and crosiers. … In the background (right) two demons fly above a breaking staff surmounted with the cap of liberty; at its feet lies a man in chains. A firing squad aims at women and children; buildings are in flames. The (printed) ‘Explanation: ‘JOHN BULL is sitting under his favourite Oak, supported by Commerce and Industry reaping the Fruits of his Labors, and protected by the power of God, whilst France is enslaved under their Tree of Liberty, which is falling to the Ground – the Honors and Independence of Nations are broken and trampled underfoot, and all the Horrors of War are extending their Ravages with unremitting fury. – Bonaparte is considered as the Dragon, the Beast, and the false Prophet, Rev. xvi. 13, xiii. II, and following verses, xix. 20 – and also as Gog, Ezek. xxxviii. and xxxix. – His brutal and ferocious Dispositions are represented by the Body and Feet of a Tyger; his inordinate Desires, by the Chest, Wings, and Claws of a Dragon, holding out Death or Slavery; his Head with two Horns represents his civil and ecclesiastical Authority; and is intended to point out, that though a Dragon and a Tyger have been the most dreadful and destructive of all real and imaginary Creatures, yet even their horrid Natures are surpassed by the sanguinary and rapacious Dispositions of that implacable Tyrant. – The THREE LIONS represent the united Naval, Regular and Volunteer Force of England, Scotland, and Ireland, watching the Monster’s Motions, and springing forth eager to meet him.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • TitleAn hieroglyphic, describing the state of Great Britain and the continent of Europe, for 1804 [graphic] / I.[?]M.
  • Publication[London : Printed by C. Stower, Charles Street, Hatton Garden, for the “Prophetic mirror, or A hint to England” by L. Mayer, 1804]

Catalog Record & Digital Collection

804.00.00.19+

Acquired May 2016

Arming John Bull to fight the buggoboos!!!

lwlpr34235 (1024x813)

John Bull, a much overburdened soldier, looks up in angry dismay at a helmet inscribed ‘Glory’ which Pitt (left) is about to place on his head. He says, “O D—-n the Glory I shall never be able to bear it all!” Pitt stands in profile to the right; the large plumed helmet which he holds up in both hands is irradiated. From his pocket hangs a long paper headed ‘List of Ships £5000000’. John Bull, short and stout, stands full face wearing a gorget, with two pistols in his belt, a long sabre suspended horizontally from his waist, its blade inscribed ‘Twenty more Kill em!’ He holds a blunderbuss in his right hand, which fires ‘Pop Pop’ into the air; a large pike in his left hand, a broadsword held in his left arm; a musket and a huge knapsack are slung on his back. In the foreground are ordnance stores: a barrel (left) inscribed ‘Right Richmond double Proof’ with cannon-balls, and (right) a cannon, cannon-balls, drum, and flag. In the background a fleet of ships sails from the shore on which stands a cheering crowd.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • CreatorCollings, Samuel, attributed name.
  • TitleArming John Bull to fight the buggoboos!!! [graphic].
  • Publication[London] : Pub. by S.W. Fores, No. 3 Piccadilly, Aug. 6, 1790.

Catalog Record & Digital Collection

790.08.06.01+

Acquired May 2016