Modern St. George attacking the monster of despotism

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“Burdett, wearing armour, attacks a seven-headed monster, which guards the gate of the Treasury, a heavy door in a stone arch (left). On his shield is a St. George’s Cross inscribed ‘Bill of Rights’ and ‘Magna Charta’; at his feet is the word ‘Independance’ [cf. British Museum Satires No. 10732]. He says: “I will Stand up for the Rights of the People Or Perish in the Attempt”. The monster has a scaly body, webbed and barbed wings, a barbed tail, and fierce talons; its seven serpent-like necks, terminating in human heads, are encircled by a collar inscribed ‘Coruption’ [in reversed characters). All spit at Burdett, three emit words: Perceval says: “I Perceive what hes Doing”; Croker says: “I begin to Croke”; a third, Lethbridge (identified by his words), says: “Bless me He makes my Hair stand on End like the Quills upon the fretfull Porcupine”. His hair is standing up, and is flanked by two locks which suggest ass’s ears. A profile resembles Windham; one head may be presumed to represent Yorke. Under the feet of the monster are three torn papers: ‘Act of Habeas Corpus’, ‘Compact between the King and the People’, ‘Petition of Right’.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Heath, William, 1795-1840, printmaker.
  • Title: Modern St. George attacking the monster of despotism [graphic].
  • Publication: [London] : Pub. 6th of April by Fores, 50 Picadilli [sic], [6 April] 1810.

Catalog Record 

810.04.06.01+

Acquired October 2018

The Devils doings

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“The Devil (right), in the foreground and much larger than the other figures, stands Asmodeus-like on a house-top (cf. British Museum Satires No. 16160), overturning with a long pole a dinner-table and upsetting the guests who fall on clouds of Dust. He is a grotesque muscular creature with goat’s legs, barbed wings and tail, and looks round with a triumphant grin at the spectator. The guests are also assailed by harpies, little winged men, whose bodies terminate in barbed and scaly tails. One of these (Corder), holding a long bill which rises into the air above him, assails a man (Roach) mounted on a cockroach and holding up a book inscribed Parish Acct; he is The Grand Carver mounted on his Cockroach.; from the cockroach’s antennae hang two big keys, and it emits a tail-blast inscribed We are of the Select, against his assailant. The latter holds out a paper inscribed Majority 7 and says am I not the Elect. Another harpy holding out a constable’s staff flies menacingly towards the cockroach, saying, By St Thomas I cheque this. Roach exclaims: I tell you it’s all a farce so we have taken the liberty to Cribb the Books Keep the Keys tight Cockey. A third harpy threatens the feast with a pair of spurred cavalry boots, saying you will Do-Well to give in, showing he is T. W. Dow (a boot-maker of York Street, Covent Garden. P.O. London Directory, 1822), see British Museum Satires No. 15528. A fourth has seized a paunchy Vestryman by the nose; the victim screams Oh my Nose–Rose Water rose water–oh oh oh– From the table fall birds, hare, tureen, decanter, pineapple, &c. The dust forms a background, and is inscribed Dust for the Eyes of the Parishioners; looming through it is the façade of St. Paul’s, Covent Garden. The bill held by Corder is headed Dinners. The items are Richardson £8-5, Hodgson & Gan £47-11-0, wine 5. 3. 0. Hodgson & Gan[n] Venison feast 30. 3- 6–Dinner on auditing Accounts £11- 4- 0, Hodg & Gann Ditto £40 4-0, Richardson Visitation Din . . £22. 7. 6, Joys St Thomas Day Dinner £20-10-0—&c &c.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • Printmaker: Heath, William, 1795-1840, printmaker.
  • Title: The Devils doings, or, The cruel radical harpies destroying a feast [graphic] / [man with an umbrella] Eqs. de.
  • Publication: [London] : Pub. by T. McLean, 26 Haymarket …, [April 1828]

Catalog Record

828.04.00.02+

Acquired October 2018