A Gallic idol

lwlpr35017-767x1024

“A symbolical bust of Napoleon, dressed as a Roman emperor, is on a rectangular base on which are title and inscription : ‘Symbolical of the Effects produced by that Cause which the enlightened (Fox) [Depicted] in ye Eighteenth Century sagaciously predicted would ultimately prove a Stupendous Monument of Human Wisdom!!!’ The head is turned in profile to the left.; the features are conventional but express ferocity, with glaring eye and fierce frown. It wears a fantastic helmet wreathed with laurel from which blood drips. The wreath is entwined by serpents, whose (three) heads are clustered at the back with words in large letters issuing from their jaws: ‘Rapine’, ‘Lust’, ‘Murder’. The word ‘Invasion’ issues in the same manner from the mouth. Above the wreath the helmet is encircled by a band on which are quasi-zodiacal signs: a scorpion, a sickle, a crescent, an arrow, a caduceus, a goat-like monster. On the helmet sits a grinning Devil, playing a fiddle and spreading his webbed wings over the idol‘s head, while from under one wing Death, a skeleton, peers out; he holds a javelin poised to strike and a cup of poison inscribed ‘Jaffa’ [see British Museum Satires No. 10063]. The shoulders are covered by drapery, drawn aside to reveal (rotten) ribs and a torn and bleeding heart which is transfixed by a dagger and a barbed spear. A scroll floats from the dagger inscribed ‘Wilsons Narrative’; the spear has a scroll inscribed ‘British Press’ and is surmounted by a cap of Liberty. Fragments torn from the heart are inscribed ‘Acre’ [see British Museum Satires No. 9412], ‘Egypt’ [see British Museum Satires No. 9250, &c], and ‘Irel[and]’, while in the middle of the heart is a triangular patch: ‘England’. The heart is surmounted by a crown made of blood-stained daggers with a central fleur-de-lis.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • PrintmakerBarth, J. S., printmaker.
  • TitleA Gallic idol [graphic] / J. Boyne del. ; J. Barth sc.
  • PublicationLondon : Published by R. Cribb, 20 Augt. 1803.

Catalog Record & Digital Collection

803.08.20.01+

Acquired October 2016

 

An hieroglyphic, describing the state of Great Britain and the continent of Europe

lwlpr34233_m-1024x612

“Three symmetrically prancing lions (left) and Napoleon (right) as ‘The Beast’ face each other across a narrow channel. In the background (left) John Bull, an obese citizen, sits surrounded by casks and bales (one marked ‘I’ or ‘L M’) under the Tree of the ‘Constitution’. This has three branches: in the uppermost is a royal crown, the others (presumably) represent the Lords and Commons, … Behind him are symbols of industry: men reaping, a bee-hive, a thatched farm-house. Above the tree flies an angel with a flaming sword … Napoleon’s head is scarcely caricatured, but has two horns – on one is poised an imperial crown, on the other the Papal tiara. In his dragon’s claws he holds up a dagger and three short chains (for the lions); he is branded ‘666’, and his tail is triply barbed. He has webbed wings, scaly shoulders, and a tiger-like body. Under his feet are broken fragments of crowns, sceptres, and crosiers. … In the background (right) two demons fly above a breaking staff surmounted with the cap of liberty; at its feet lies a man in chains. A firing squad aims at women and children; buildings are in flames. The (printed) ‘Explanation: ‘JOHN BULL is sitting under his favourite Oak, supported by Commerce and Industry reaping the Fruits of his Labors, and protected by the power of God, whilst France is enslaved under their Tree of Liberty, which is falling to the Ground – the Honors and Independence of Nations are broken and trampled underfoot, and all the Horrors of War are extending their Ravages with unremitting fury. – Bonaparte is considered as the Dragon, the Beast, and the false Prophet, Rev. xvi. 13, xiii. II, and following verses, xix. 20 – and also as Gog, Ezek. xxxviii. and xxxix. – His brutal and ferocious Dispositions are represented by the Body and Feet of a Tyger; his inordinate Desires, by the Chest, Wings, and Claws of a Dragon, holding out Death or Slavery; his Head with two Horns represents his civil and ecclesiastical Authority; and is intended to point out, that though a Dragon and a Tyger have been the most dreadful and destructive of all real and imaginary Creatures, yet even their horrid Natures are surpassed by the sanguinary and rapacious Dispositions of that implacable Tyrant. – The THREE LIONS represent the united Naval, Regular and Volunteer Force of England, Scotland, and Ireland, watching the Monster’s Motions, and springing forth eager to meet him.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • TitleAn hieroglyphic, describing the state of Great Britain and the continent of Europe, for 1804 [graphic] / I.[?]M.
  • Publication[London : Printed by C. Stower, Charles Street, Hatton Garden, for the “Prophetic mirror, or A hint to England” by L. Mayer, 1804]

Catalog Record & Digital Collection

804.00.00.19+

Acquired May 2016

Boney’s inquisition

lwlpr33301 (1024x707)

Four French soldiers with hot pincers torturing “Madame Toussaint” by burning her flesh and pulling out her fingernails; Napoleon gloats on a throne to the right.

  • PrintmakerWilliams, Charles, active 1797-1830, artist.
  • TitleBoney’s inquisition [graphic] : another specimen of his humanity on the person of Madame Toussaint.
  • Publication[London] : Pubd. Octr. 25th 1804 by by S.W. Fores, 50 Piccadilly, [25 October 1804]

Catalog Record & Digital Collection

804.10.25.01+

Acquired November 2015

The Corsican bloodhound, beset by the bears of Russia

lwlpr32590 (1024x680)

A satire on Napoleon’s Russian campaign. A large hound with the head of Napoleon in his bicorne hat with a feather colored red, white and blue, flees in terror towards the right, pursued by a pack of charging bears (Russia). The handle of a kettle with the words “Moskow tin-kettle etched in its side is tied to the hound’s tail, its contents spilling out — Famine, Oppression, Frost, Mortality, Destruction, Death, Horror, Moskow annihilation. The collar around his next reads “From Moskow” and the chain drags along on the ground. In the distance a city in flames.

  • PrintmakerElmes, William, active 1797-1814, printmaker.
  • TitleThe Corsican bloodhound, beset by the bears of Russia [graphic].
  • PublicationLondon : Pudb. Marh. 7th 1813 by Thos. Tegg. 111 Cheapside, London, [7 March 1813]

Catalog Record & Digital Collection

813.03.07.01

Acquired June 2015

 

The little princess and Gulliver

lwlpr32587 (785x1024)

“Princess Charlotte (three-quarter length) stands at a table looking into a large (chinoiserie) punch-bowl (right) in which Bonaparte frantically swims towards her, among agitated waves, his large hat floating in the water. The Princess, very mature for her seven years, wears a cap with a jewelled fillet inscribed ‘Ich Di[en]’ in which are three feathers. Round her neck on a rope of pearls hangs an oval miniature of the Prince of Wales. She holds her left fist over the bowl, saying, “There you impertinent boasting swaggering Pigmy, – take that, – You attempt to take my Grandpap’s Crown indeed, and plunder all his Subjects, Fillet you know that the Spirit and Indignation of every Girl in the Kingdom is roused at your Insolence.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • PrintmakerWilliams, C. (Charles), active 1797-1830, printmaker.
  • TitleThe little princess and Gulliver [graphic].
  • Published[London : Pubd Octobr 21st 1803 by S.W.Fores 50 Piccadilly, 21 October 1803]

Catalog Record & Digital Collection

803.10.21.01

Acquired June 2015

 

Cossack sports, or, The Platoff hunt in full cry after French game

lwlpr32589 (1024x754)

A satire on Napoleon’s Russian campaign. “Cossacks, led by Platoff, pursue, across a river, a fox with the head and huge bicorne of Napoleon. The Russians ride their horses through the water. The fox, larger in scale than the other figures, takes a flying leap to the shore (right). He says: “Hark, I hear the Cry of Cossacks. The [sic] have got Scent of me -I must take to my heels once more, the are close to my Brush.” His tail is inscribed ‘Corsican Fox’. Across the lower edge of the design runs a strip of land on which are frogs; one, inscribed ‘French Frog’, waddles off, while one on the extreme left is being speared. Of the other frogs a few turn to oppose the Cossacks with bayonets; these have a tricolour flag; the majority are escaping to the right, a row of heads and sloped bayonets, with one eagle. Platoff, whose high fur cap has a long plume inscribed ‘Platoff’, riding with levelled spear, shouts: “Hark forward my boys get along! he runs in view. Yoics. Yoics. There he goes, Tally-ho!” His daughter, in the middle distance, rides through the water, pointing with the hand that holds the reins, and raising a whip; she shouts: “Hi, ho, Tally, ho! For a husband.” Cossacks gallop up from the background (left), leap from a low cliff into the river, and swim through it, one carrying a standard with the Russian eagle, behind the two Platoffs. In the background is a town flying a flag inscribed ‘Leapsic’; tiny horsemen, evidently Cossacks, gallop out of the city gate.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • PrintmakerElmes, William, active 1797-1814, printmaker.
  • TitleCossack sports, or, The Platoff hunt in full cry after French game [graphic] / Wm. E.
  • Publication[London : Pubd. Novr. 9th 1813 by Thos. Tegg, No. 111 Cheapside, 9 November 1813]

Catalog Record & Digital Collection

813.11.09.01 Impression 2

Acquired June 2015

A tit bit for a Cossack

lwlpr32588 (660x1024)

A satire on Napoleon in Russia. The daughter of Count Platoff stands full face, erect, dashing, and alluring, on a snowy mound. Her right hand supports a spear from which floats a banner inscribed: ‘I General Count Platoff. promise to give my Daughter in Marriage and 2000 Rubles – to any Cossack, Russian, Prusian, German, Sweede, Turk, John Bull, Sauny Bull Paddy Bull or any other Bull, who shall bring Me the Head of Little Bony dead or a live.’ She wears fur-trimmed cap with a long hussar-bag, long high-waisted fur-bordered pelisse, with a cape, fur-trimmed boots, and large ear-rings. The words ‘Hih “ho” for a Husband’ issue from closed and smiling lips. With her left hand she points behind her to the right and to the little figure of Napoleon on skates, wearing a large plumed bicorne, and brandishing his sabre; he deserts his snow-bound army, saying, “O” ho” bygare I had best be Off.” He strides past the heads of soldiers emerging from snow, together with bayonets, and a French flag; behind him the French army marches in close ranks, with one eagle and one flag. On the left is another column of tiny soldiers indicated by heads, bayonets, an eagle, and flags. In the clouds, airborne as in No. 11992 (British Museum catalogue), are two bands of galloping Cossacks, one (right) seems about to swoop down on Napoleon. Heavy clouds frame slanting rays which make a background for Platoff’s daughter. At her feet are two money–bags both inscribed ‘1,000 Rubles’, which disgorge coins. Behind them a kneeling Cupid aims his bow towards the ‘cloud of Cossacks’ on the left.”–British Museum catalogue.

  • PrintmakerElmes, William, active 1797-1814, printmaker.
  • TitleA tit bit for a Cossack, or, The Platoff prize, for the head of Buonaparte [graphic] / Wm. Es.
  • PublicationLondon : Pubd. by Thos Tegg, 111 Cheapside, Jany. 4th 1813.

Catalog Record & Digital Collection

813.01.04.01

Acquired June 2015