The transiting of Venus over the Sun’s disk

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“The Duke of York’s head in profile to the left is the centre of rays which at some distance are obscured by dark clouds. The eye and part of the face are hidden by a five-pointed star, in which is the head of Mrs. Clarke, also in profile to the left. The star casts a sharp shadow on the Duke’s face. His very thick neck is encircled by a military collar and black stock. Below the title: ‘This Phenomena was known to a few Philosophers previous to its becoming visible to the public Eye, and we are assured by many Scientific persons, is not likely to happen again within the existance of the present generation–vide Vox Stellum’.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • PrintmakerWilliams, Charles, active 1797-1830, printmaker.
  • TitleThe transiting of Venus over the Sun’s disk [graphic] : March 1809.
  • Publication[London] : Pubd. April 1809 by Walker, Cornhill, [April 1809]

Catalog Record & Digital Collection

809.04.00.01+

Acquired October 2016

The traytors coat of arms

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A broadside, anti-Jacobite, anti-Catholic and anti-French. The lilies of the French Royal arms changed to upside down frogs and the legitimacy of the Stewart line questioned by the inclusion of the bed-pan child over the priest’s shoulder.

  • TitleThe traytors coat of arms [graphic].
  • Publication[London?] : [publisher not identified], publish’d September the 16th, 1746, according to act of Parliament.

Catalog Record & Digital Collection

746.09.16.01++

Acquired October 2016

A Gallic idol

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“A symbolical bust of Napoleon, dressed as a Roman emperor, is on a rectangular base on which are title and inscription : ‘Symbolical of the Effects produced by that Cause which the enlightened (Fox) [Depicted] in ye Eighteenth Century sagaciously predicted would ultimately prove a Stupendous Monument of Human Wisdom!!!’ The head is turned in profile to the left.; the features are conventional but express ferocity, with glaring eye and fierce frown. It wears a fantastic helmet wreathed with laurel from which blood drips. The wreath is entwined by serpents, whose (three) heads are clustered at the back with words in large letters issuing from their jaws: ‘Rapine’, ‘Lust’, ‘Murder’. The word ‘Invasion’ issues in the same manner from the mouth. Above the wreath the helmet is encircled by a band on which are quasi-zodiacal signs: a scorpion, a sickle, a crescent, an arrow, a caduceus, a goat-like monster. On the helmet sits a grinning Devil, playing a fiddle and spreading his webbed wings over the idol‘s head, while from under one wing Death, a skeleton, peers out; he holds a javelin poised to strike and a cup of poison inscribed ‘Jaffa’ [see British Museum Satires No. 10063]. The shoulders are covered by drapery, drawn aside to reveal (rotten) ribs and a torn and bleeding heart which is transfixed by a dagger and a barbed spear. A scroll floats from the dagger inscribed ‘Wilsons Narrative’; the spear has a scroll inscribed ‘British Press’ and is surmounted by a cap of Liberty. Fragments torn from the heart are inscribed ‘Acre’ [see British Museum Satires No. 9412], ‘Egypt’ [see British Museum Satires No. 9250, &c], and ‘Irel[and]’, while in the middle of the heart is a triangular patch: ‘England’. The heart is surmounted by a crown made of blood-stained daggers with a central fleur-de-lis.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • PrintmakerBarth, J. S., printmaker.
  • TitleA Gallic idol [graphic] / J. Boyne del. ; J. Barth sc.
  • PublicationLondon : Published by R. Cribb, 20 Augt. 1803.

Catalog Record & Digital Collection

803.08.20.01+

Acquired October 2016

 

A shew heifer going to Leinster Stable Yard

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Lord Leinster, personified as a rough Irish farmer, leads Queen Caroline by a rope around her neck. Leinster expounds: ‘Dam me! no one but the D… shall stop her.’ Another figure in the background, probably Bartolomeo Pergami, replies: ‘Stop Nosey, let me feel that Heifer.’

  • TitleA shew heifer going to Leinster Stable Yard [graphic].
  • Publication[Dublin : Pub. by McCleary, 21 Nassau Street, 1820]

Catalog Record & Digital Collection

820.00.00.112

Acquired November 2016

Poor Mr. Bull in a pretty situation

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“John Bull, a fat “cit”, is beset by descending water covered with the word ‘Tax’, many times repeated, in which dogs, cats, and pitchforks fall with violence. His eyes and spectacles are transfixed by a pitchfork inscribed ‘Window Tax’; the shaft of another inscribed ‘Malt & Hops Tax’ sticks in his bleeding mouth, dislodging teeth. His paunch is pierced with a third fork; the handle, inscribed ‘Tax …’ [&c. &c], supports an angry cat, spitting ‘Tax …’ Another falling cat knocks off his wig, which emits a cloud of powder inscribed ‘Powder Tax’. His gouty feet, in slashed shoes, are stabbed by three pitchforks: ‘Corn Laws’ [the biggest, cf. British Museum Satires No. 15510]; ‘Leather Tax’; ‘Land Tax’. A ‘Dog Tax’ strikes down J. B.’s dog, its collar inscribed ‘Poor Tray’. Another dog worries a cat (left). J. B. holds up a derelict umbrella, inscribed ‘Trade’, pierced by many prongs and useless.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • PrintmakerHeath, William, 1795-1840, printmaker.
  • TitlePoor Mr. Bull in a pretty situation [graphic] : for the rain it raineth every day / W. Heath.
  • Publication[London : Pub. March 20, 1830, by T. McLean, 26 Haymarket, London, 20 March 1830]

Catalog Record & Digital Collection

830.03.20.02+

Acquired May 2016

An hieroglyphic, describing the state of Great Britain and the continent of Europe

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“Three symmetrically prancing lions (left) and Napoleon (right) as ‘The Beast’ face each other across a narrow channel. In the background (left) John Bull, an obese citizen, sits surrounded by casks and bales (one marked ‘I’ or ‘L M’) under the Tree of the ‘Constitution’. This has three branches: in the uppermost is a royal crown, the others (presumably) represent the Lords and Commons, … Behind him are symbols of industry: men reaping, a bee-hive, a thatched farm-house. Above the tree flies an angel with a flaming sword … Napoleon’s head is scarcely caricatured, but has two horns – on one is poised an imperial crown, on the other the Papal tiara. In his dragon’s claws he holds up a dagger and three short chains (for the lions); he is branded ‘666’, and his tail is triply barbed. He has webbed wings, scaly shoulders, and a tiger-like body. Under his feet are broken fragments of crowns, sceptres, and crosiers. … In the background (right) two demons fly above a breaking staff surmounted with the cap of liberty; at its feet lies a man in chains. A firing squad aims at women and children; buildings are in flames. The (printed) ‘Explanation: ‘JOHN BULL is sitting under his favourite Oak, supported by Commerce and Industry reaping the Fruits of his Labors, and protected by the power of God, whilst France is enslaved under their Tree of Liberty, which is falling to the Ground – the Honors and Independence of Nations are broken and trampled underfoot, and all the Horrors of War are extending their Ravages with unremitting fury. – Bonaparte is considered as the Dragon, the Beast, and the false Prophet, Rev. xvi. 13, xiii. II, and following verses, xix. 20 – and also as Gog, Ezek. xxxviii. and xxxix. – His brutal and ferocious Dispositions are represented by the Body and Feet of a Tyger; his inordinate Desires, by the Chest, Wings, and Claws of a Dragon, holding out Death or Slavery; his Head with two Horns represents his civil and ecclesiastical Authority; and is intended to point out, that though a Dragon and a Tyger have been the most dreadful and destructive of all real and imaginary Creatures, yet even their horrid Natures are surpassed by the sanguinary and rapacious Dispositions of that implacable Tyrant. – The THREE LIONS represent the united Naval, Regular and Volunteer Force of England, Scotland, and Ireland, watching the Monster’s Motions, and springing forth eager to meet him.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • TitleAn hieroglyphic, describing the state of Great Britain and the continent of Europe, for 1804 [graphic] / I.[?]M.
  • Publication[London : Printed by C. Stower, Charles Street, Hatton Garden, for the “Prophetic mirror, or A hint to England” by L. Mayer, 1804]

Catalog Record & Digital Collection

804.00.00.19+

Acquired May 2016

A catalogue of the kitchin furniture of John Bull Esqr.

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“Satire on Bute’s alleged sale of public positions paralleled with Earl Talbot’s introduction of economies into the royal household. An auction is taking place in a large kitchen where, in the centre, Talbot, Lord Steward of the Household, instructs the auctioneer’s clerk at a table beneath the podium. On the left, three cooks, one a Frenchman planning to leave for Calais to work for “Monsr. Grandsire”, are mocked by a Scot for not being able to make haggis; another cook brandishing a gridiron and two ladles stands in front of the fireplace in which stands only a cracked pot filled with thistles. On the right, a poor man plans to bid for “old rags or broken glass”, and a stout middle-class woman plans to purchase a ladle to beat her husband, while Princess Augusta and Lord Bute converse intimately; the Princess points suggestively to a large pot resting with other utensils on the floor. In the background, a chaplain laments the lack both “of victuals and of grace”.”–British Museum online catalogue.

  • TitleA catalogue of the kitchin furniture of John Bull Esqr. leaving of house-keeping now selling by auction [graphic].
  • Publication[London : Publish’d according to act of Parliament by J. Williams, next the Mitre Tavern, Fleet Street, 1762]

Catalog Record & Digital Collection

762.00.00.153

Acquired April 2016