Journey from Paris to Naples, 1769

Journey from Paris to Naples, 1769 [Front cover]Bunbury, Henry William, 1750-1811

Journey from Paris to Naples, 1769.

LWL Mss Vol. 181

Manuscript, in a single hand, documenting Bunbury’s trip from Paris starting on 16 June 1759 to Auxerre and Dijon, continuing on through the Burgundy wine region to Geneva, making observations on the many smaller towns and sites he visited, commenting on the roads, the wine, the vineyards, the people, and the scenery. He quotes Addison’s description of the Rhone. He is very positively impressed with Marseilles, commenting at length both on the beauty of the city and the lively crowds of people of various nationalities. He records his impressions of the “happy” galley slaves. He writes at length about his impressions of the Roman ruins at Nimes as well as Marseilles, Nice, Monaco, Genoa. Though he remarks on the beauty of Genoa, he has a low opinion of the Genoese character. He describes the use of oxen in the city and the presence of the Jesuits who are not well-thought of but tolerated because so many of them come from the “very first families of the state.” He arrives in Florence in the evening of July 19. He is not impressed with the bridge of which he has heard so much noting that he thinks it is “inferior in size to our Thames Bridge” as well as in beauty. He writes about the cathedral and the Medici Mausoleum and concludes with a detailed description of the Uffizi sculpture and paintings “by the most celebrated painters.” He concludes with a list of a list of the works that most impressed him and rates the “gallery of Florence” as one of the “first curiosities in Italy.”

Journey from Paris to Naples, 1769 Subjects (Library of Congress): Bunbury, Henry William, 1750-1811; Travelers’ writings, English; France–Description and travel; Italy–Description and travel.

Lewis Walpole Library new acquisition: May, 2010

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About lewiswalpolelibrary

The Lewis Walpole Library, a department of the Yale University Library since 1980, is an internationally recognized research collection in the field of British eighteenth-century studies. Its unrivalled collection of Walpoliana includes half the traceable volumes from Horace Walpole's famous library at Strawberry Hill and many letters and other manuscripts by him. The Library's book and manuscript collections, numbering over 32,000 volumes, cover all aspects of eighteenth-century British culture. The Library is also home to the largest and finest collection of eighteenth-century British graphic art outside the British Museum; its 35,000 satirical prints, portraits, and topographical views are an incomparable resource for visual material on many facets of English life of the period. Located in Farmington, Connecticut, forty miles north of New Haven and within easy distance of Boston and New York, the Lewis Walpole Library's collections also include drawings, paintings, and furniture, all housed on a 14-acre campus with four historically important structures and extensive grounds. The Library runs an active fellowship program and sponsors conferences, lectures, and exhibitions in cooperation with other Yale libraries and departments.

3 thoughts on “Journey from Paris to Naples, 1769

  1. The collection is quite impressive. The images you post show great examples of the fine art of printing and book making. Sadly you don’t see such fine examples these days. I will continue to check back regularly to see posts on new acquisitions.

  2. Pingback: Keeping Track — New Acquisitions Blog at the Walpole Library « Enfilade

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